8×8 rule: drink eight glasses containing eight ounces of water every day for optimum health

8×8 rule: drink eight glasses containing eight ounces of water every day for optimum health

Curiosity Quenched About 8×8 Water Recommendation: Medical Research, Poisoning, Prevention, Sport Medicine, Supplements

Just as most of the rest of us have, two doctors at the University of Pennsylvania have always heard that we need to drink eight glasses containing eight ounces of water every day for optimum health, a theory often dubbed the 8×8 rule. But they did more than just drink the water. They set out to examine the health benefits associated with drinking so much water.

Stanly Goldfarb, MD, and Dan Negoianu, MD, both of the university’s Renal Electrolyte, and Hypertension Division in Philadelphia studied the data from previously published clinical trials looking for solid scientific evidence of the health benefits of so much water. They found little evidence to support the health benefits of drinking a half gallon of water every day but they found little evidence of harm in doing so either. And they were unable to uncover the original source of the advice that most of us have heard since childhood.

In some cases, such as athletes; people who live in hot, dry environments; and those with certain medical conditions, more is better but there have been no studies weighing the benefits of following the 8×8 rule in average, healthy people.

One popular theory behind the 8×8 water rule is that that much water helps expel toxins from the body by enhancing kidney function. And it does, to a degree, although there is no clinical evidence of the health benefit in healthy individuals for doing so.

Another theory says organ function throughout the body will be enhanced as long as the water is sipped slowly over the course of the day instead of consumed in a few big gulps. The researchers could find no documented evidence to support this theory, either.

Some people report an increased incidence of headaches when water consumption is low. In one small study the doctors reviewed, the group drinking the most water reported fewer headaches than the control group but the difference in the number of headaches was so small between the two groups as to be considered insignificant.

Water as a beauty treatment was also studied. Many people think drinking lots of water will increase skin tone, keeping it younger looking. What actually happens, though, is that people who don’t drink enough water have skin that becomes dehydrated, losing its turgor, which adds to the appearance of aging.

Look for “Just Add Water,” the editorial written by Goldfarb and Negoianu in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN) dated June 2008.

The following are just comments. Just give a comment afterwards.
More about Diet»
Curiosity Quenched About 8×8 Water Recommendation
Will an Hourglass Figure Keep You Sane?
The Relationship Between Dieting and Partnerships
Healthy Food Translates to Brain Food in children
Cantaloupe Warnings Unjust Says Honduran President
Cantaloupes May Be the Cause of Salmonella Outbreak, FDA Warns
Pass the Popcorn But Beware the “Butter”
Rare Disorder Sheds New Light on Obesity, Appetite, Blood Pressure
ADHD May Lead to Eating Disorders in Girls
A Little exercise Goes A Long Way For Obese women
More about Exercise»
Curiosity Quenched About 8×8 Water Recommendation
A Little Exercise Goes A Long Way For Obese Women
Virtual Gaming Not Adequate Source of Physical Exercise
Healthy Lifestyle Can Last 100 Years
Mother’s Physical Activity During Pregnancy Likely To Affect Child’s Future Energy Level
Mediterranean Diet and Exercise Proven Healthy
Making Sport of Physical Therapy
More about Family»
90,000 Babies In US Mistreated During First Year of Life
Curiosity Quenched About 8×8 Water Recommendation
Could Schizophrenia Be Entirely Genetic?
Singulair May Be Linked To Increased Risk Of Suicide
Real Geeks Don’t Wear Glasses
Will an Hourglass Figure Keep You Sane?
The Relationship Between Dieting and Partnerships
Take Care of Your Teeth and You’ll Take Care of Your Baby
The Battle Never Ends for Some Preemies
Healthy Food Translates to Brain Food in Children
More about Headlines»
Curiosity Quenched About 8×8 Water Recommendation
Could Schizophrenia Be Entirely Genetic?
Mini Flu Detection Lab Fast, Accurate, and Portable
Substance in Heparin Found
Chronic Sleep Disruption Leads to Heart, Kidney Disease
Pass the Popcorn But Beware the “Butter”
Natural, Organic, and Toxic Too?
Heparin Stopped at the Border
An Achy, Breaky Heart and Hackers, Too
PSA Levels Becoming Less Predictive
More about Lifestyle»
Satisfactory Sex Can Be Achieved In A Matter Of Minutes
90,000 Babies In US Mistreated During First Year of Life
Curiosity Quenched About 8×8 Water Recommendation
Smoking, Cancer May Be Linked By Genetics
Singulair May Be Linked To Increased Risk Of Suicide
Real Geeks Don’t Wear Glasses
Will an Hourglass Figure Keep You Sane?
The Relationship Between Dieting and Partnerships
The Battle Never Ends for Some Preemies
Blacks at Highest Risk but Undergo Fewest Colonoscopies
More about Medical Research»
Curiosity Quenched About 8×8 Water Recommendation
Smoking, Cancer May Be Linked By Genetics
Vytorin, Zetia Maybe Not Such a Good Idea
Could Schizophrenia Be Entirely Genetic?
Real Geeks Don’t Wear Glasses
The Battle Never Ends for Some Preemies
Fewer Obese Women Screened For Certain Cancers
Healthy Food Translates to Brain Food in Children
Therapeutic Cloning for Parkinson’s Works in Lab Mice
Happily Married Have Lower Blood Pressure
More about Poisoning»
Curiosity Quenched About 8×8 Water Recommendation
Cantaloupe Warnings Unjust Says Honduran President
Cantaloupes May Be the Cause of Salmonella Outbreak, FDA Warns
Natural, Organic, and Toxic Too?
Heparin Stopped at the Border
Tainted Water Flows Through America
Pills in Gorton’s Fish Fillets Found to be Herbal Supplements
Public Drinking Water Contains Traces of Drugs
Contaminated Heparin Found in Germany
CDC Reacted Too Late to Formaldahyde in FEMA Trailers
More about Prevention»
Satisfactory Sex Can Be Achieved In A Matter Of Minutes
90,000 Babies In US Mistreated During First Year of Life
Curiosity Quenched About 8×8 Water Recommendation
Smoking, Cancer May Be Linked By Genetics
The Relationship Between Dieting and Partnerships
Take Care of Your Teeth and You’ll Take Care of Your Baby
Tobacco Company Paid For Cancer Study
The Battle Never Ends for Some Preemies
Blacks at Highest Risk but Undergo Fewest Colonoscopies
Free-Sample Meds Come With Hefty Price Tag
More about Sport Medicine»
Curiosity Quenched About 8×8 Water Recommendation
HGH – All Hype, No Performance?
All Head Hits Dangerous On Football Field
More about Supplements»
Curiosity Quenched About 8×8 Water Recommendation
Free-Sample Meds Come With Hefty Price Tag
Substance in Heparin Found
HGH – All Hype, No Performance?
Natural, Organic, and Toxic Too?
Tainted Water Flows Through America
Pills in Gorton’s Fish Fillets Found to be Herbal Supplements
Public Drinking Water Contains Traces of Drugs
Gingko Biloba, Memory Study Brings Surprises
Children with Down Syndrome Do Not Benefit From Antioxidants

My wife told me about this article and I had to write in because this doctor is a farce. Dr. Stanley Goldfarb of the University of Pennsylvania says, “If you want to throw away your water bottle, feel free to do so.” There is a lot of scientific evidence.

I wouldn’t believe anything he says. Please go to http://health.iflove.com and read about this. Every disease that is known to man has been help by water. Our bodies are 80% water and when our body does not have enough water the first signs of dehydration are acid reflux and constipation. Over time dehydration, acidosis and free radicals cause disease.

Sounds like he gave up being a doctor that truly helped people to get well and stay well.

Brad, you’re taking things a bit too far. The Doctor is not saying water is not good for you, nor is he saying having water isn’t a requirement. What is said tho, is that we don’t have evidence to show that we need to have 8 glasses of pure water a day. We get water, often close to 8 cups a day by other means besides pure water. With all the moisture found in foods, fruits, misc. drinks besides water, and on and on. This water is necessary, but having to ‘’supplement” this usual water intake is not, as in 8 glasses of water. Not going to hurt, but not needed. There used to be an argument that the extra water would help the body rid of toxins, but its been seen over and over, that the kidneys do their job of filtering toxins very well, extremely well I should say, and they do this magnificent job without regards to extra water intake. Its just not a requirement for the kidneys. Less water or, more water, the filtering is the same. Also, of course if a person sweats a great deal perhaps from working out, or otherwise, and has lost alot of water, common sense says to replace it. That’s not the question or issue here either.

I think you are both making more assumptions than the data here supports. The authors were unable to find “clinical evidence” to support the conclusion that the 8×8 rule was benificial. That nethier supports or invalidates the theory. It tells me that the topic most likely has not been studied well. That is all.

Neither does it discount the observations of doctors, coaches, trainer, and nutritionists in practice that have noticed the benefits of adequate water consumption in their practices.

Take this paragraph ” Water as a beauty treatment was also studied. Many people think drinking lots of water will increase skin tone, keeping it younger looking. What actually happens, though, is that people who don’t drink enough water have skin that becomes dehydrated, losing its turgor, which adds to the appearance of aging.” This paragraph, to me, seems to be written to denouce the fact that water intake could have a positive effect on skin appearance. However, since turgor results from the pressure of water in the tissues, the fact is that water consumption would then have a positive impact on skin appearance.

The bottom line is summaries are always (dangerous word) an opinion of how the data should be interpreted. I recommend you read the study, evalute the data yourself, and decide what the data really shows.

Finally some common sense returns.
It seems we never have intelligent informed discussions in America – just a series of hysterical fads, followed by deflated expectations and hysterical commentary by “experts”.

We seek salvation everywhere, especialy in excessive consumption. We drive the largest cars, lug home the largest shopping bags, spend most time in traffic jams, consume the largest amount of junk food in front of the largest TVs, and then try to fit 8 glasses of water into this madness. And think we’re the luickiest, the wealthiest, the most democratis, the freest, and even the most attractive people on earth.

In short, we’re absolute morons, wrong on all counts.

Does it feel natural to you to drink this much water? What happened to drinking water when you’re thirsty, or eating when hungdy, for that matter? When you eat twice as much food as your body needs, what happens?
THat’s right , you wind up looking the way you look now. When you work too much, what happens?
That’s right, you get streesed, you become boring, you become sexually-handicapped. Oh, but you get to
keep your job for a while longer than your cubicle neighbor.
When you over-exercise, what do you get? Wasted time and sore muscles.
When you get too conservative and patriotic, what’s the result? You begin to believe that Earth’ is about 6,000 years and you vote for someone like Dick Cheney and his sidekick, whatshisface…TWICE

Get the point? Before joining some new fashionable hysteria, engage your brain and listen to your body.

Brad, we have heard this from you before. Why do you have to malign this doctor’s name? Why do you crave negative attention?

Why do we always have to have someone tell us that something is good or bad for us? The average American eats junk food and drinks sodas all day long, consuming at least twice as many calories as what is actually needed for their bodies. The question is not IF we can get proper hydration from sources other than water, but SHOULD we be getting it from other sources. You can drink 3 or 4 20 oz sodas a day at 240 calories each and be properly hydrated, or drink water with NO calories and be properly hydrated. Even diet sodas with their imitation sweeteners, althought they have no calories, will make you feel groggy and crave junk food. I have stopped drinking sodas totally and have been drinking nothing but water for the last two weeks. I feel MUCH better and have lost about 5 pounds so far as well. Quit listening to all of the “experts” and actually listen to what your body tells you. You’d be surprised how many of the studies are just telling Americans what they want to hear.

The article simply points out that “we don’t know”. There is no evidence to support the notion that we must consume 64 ounces of water a day. It doesn’t say not to do it. It doesn’t say any harm comes from it. It simply says that this old, highly popular notion doesn’t have a solid basis.

Claiming that a doctor is a “farce” doesn’t serve a useful purpose. Offer evidence that what the doctor says is incorrect – credible evidence, not just some special-interest site. Anyone with a little HTML knowledge can put up a site chock-full of incorrect information. Where is the credible evidence that we do, indeed, need to drink 64 ounces of water a day?

Actually, soda does not properly hydrate you. In fact, it dehydrates you. Caffeine is a diuretic. Have you ever noticed that after drinking sodas you always have to pee a lot more than usual? Caffeine is flushing all the fluids out of your system!

You can, however, achieve proper hydration through other foods and drinks, like water-soluble fruits and vegetables, soups, juices, and some teas – basically anything that has a high water content.

Well, I guess I should have said “properly” hydrated (with quotations marks). Coffee and tea are also diuretics, as well as malt beverages (beers, wine coolers, and “fashion” drinks such as Smirnoff and Bacardi 6 packs).

I also don’t understand why everyone makes such a big deal out of 64 ounces of water. That’s only 3 twenty ounce bottles! If it were any other kind of drink we wouldn’t even bat an eye at the amount. People just don’t like to drink water because it has no “flavor” compared to all the other sugary, sweetened drinks we are used to. That’s not “chugging” water all day… you’d be surprised how quickly you can go through 3 20 ounce bottles.

I always just have a bottle of water to sip on. It helps throughout the day, keeps me alert and focused on my work. I’m sure 8 is a bit to much, but I implore people to drink as much as they feel they can over the course of a day. It doesn’t hurt, so no big deal.

I’m interested in the history of the “8×8 rule.” I don’t think it was ever meant as a requirement to drink 64 ounces of pure water in addition to all the other liquids we injest. I compare it to the “food pyramid,” which is not a requirement but rather a guideline for good health. The study referenced in this article shows that increased water intake is beneficial for those who have certain medical conditions, so doesn’t it stand to reason that drinking more water might help prevent such problems? When it comes to this water issue, I’m inclined to go with what works for me by listening to my body. Sometimes a big glass of water DOES cure a headache (when brought on by mild dehydration or too much fake sugar). Water cools me down and keeps me from getting cranky in a hot office. Some days, 64 oz seems to be enough to keep me feeling good; other days I seem to need more. As a previous poster pointed out, 64 oz is not that much, especially since it INCLUDES sugar- and caffeine-free drinks.

Donate for Kindness

Hi man, if you find this article useful, please donate a few bucks to help the one in need.

Donate

Topics: ,,,,,,,,,